Author Topic: Weapon Construction  (Read 351 times)

derekjones

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Weapon Construction
« on: March 17, 2017, 09:52:46 AM »
One Handed Sword CORE:
https://goodwinds.com/7018.html

Get .750 kite pipe or .602 pipe for two handed.

Butt Cap/Pommel :You want ID 1/2" item EB1:
http://www.mudhole.com/Tapered-EVA-Butt-Caps?quantity=1&custcol83=6

For foam get 4530K161 for .410 and .505 fiberglass kite pipe. It is very snug on the 505 but is still okay:
http://www.mcmaster.com/#=131tlhp

For tape use:
https://goodwinds.com/sail-supplies/tapes/adhesive-ripstop-repair-tape.html

derekjones

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Re: Weapon Construction
« Reply #1 on: March 17, 2017, 10:32:59 AM »
Need a good foam size for the two handed core sizes.

Skarth

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Re: Weapon Construction
« Reply #2 on: April 19, 2017, 02:50:50 PM »
Some of my own weapon making tips I've found for ultralights.

Cheaper Ripstop nylon can be found here as long as you are buying more than one roll - https://www.saltydogmarine.com/advanced_search_result.php?search_in_description=1&keywords=ripstop+nylon&osCsid=fd5fa426992546feb7fb05526c645467&x=0&y=0

One roll of 25' ripstop nylon will use about 3/4 of the roll on a two handed sword. White ripstop nylon is Opaque and you may see the color of foam under it.

Buy flexible vinyl tubing with 1/2 inch ID, and 5/8 or 3/4 inch OD to force over a .505 core to increase the size of the grip (A heatgun helps), sand the tubing on the outside to scuff it up, then apply griptape or Wilson replacement racquet grips ($3 at walmart) over the tubing. You'll have thicker, and more comfortable grip.

Take a metal bolt (3 inch, 9/16 coarse thread hex bolt weighs 43 grams is a slightly heavier option for a longsword) that fits inside the core's tube, heat it up, and cover it in hot glue, then plug it into the end of the core where the pommel will be to counterweight the weapon. More counterweight means you can swing it faster, but makes the overall weapon heavier, and a bit harder to block with. I would suggest balancing a weapon to anywhere from the upper part of the grip to a few inches above the cross-guard.

Also, it is a lot cheaper to make 6 or more weapons at once than buying the materials for just one, as McMaster's and Goodwinds have high shipping prices.